ORC’s Executive Director Casey Diskin on HBOT

Casey Diskin

Oxygen is a necessity for life — to transfer energy from food into a usable form and to perform vital functions throughout the body. More than 100 years ago, a hyperbaric chamber — an enclosed space with high concentrations of oxygen at higher than atmospheric pressure — was first used in the U.S. for medical purposes.

“Through hyperbaric therapy and behavior therapy, we’re helping children suffering from autism and other disabilities succeed and achieve real personal growth,” says Casey Diskin. “However, it’s important that we also give the parents of these children a place to meet and uplift one another. To help, I run a pair of support groups that meet each month in Michigan, either in Troy or in Brighton.”

In recent years, hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has been used outside the U.S. for additional conditions such as stroke recovery, autoimmune disorders and autism. In the U.S “off-label” use of HBOT for non-FDA-approved medical treatment is permitted by licensed physicians but may not be covered by insurance.

Casey Diskin and Stroke Recovery

Today, Oxford provides a broad range of treatments for children and adults at Brighton and Troy locations. One patient, folksinger Ron Coden, 78, of Huntington Woods, began HBOT five times a week after a serious stroke in January 2020, according to his daughter Casey Diskin, M.A., Oxford’s executive director of ARTS Autism Services.

“He wasn’t talking at all and his left side was numb,” Casey Diskin said. “He started hyperbaric, and it did amazing things for his speech and neurological issues.

“He is able to hold a conversation and sing. He continues to have maintenance once a week. This keeps up the oxygen level in the blood which supports stem cell production.”

Recent research indicates that the therapy may help slow down the aging process, as measured by the shortening of telomeres, the DNA protein structure at the end of each chromosome. A small portion of telomere DNA is lost through normal cell division and over time, telomeres become shorter and cells lose their ability to divide, resulting in aging.

OXFORD RECOVERY CENTER BREAKS GROUND ON STATE-OF-THE-ART AUTISM CENTER-Casey Diskin

Oxford Recovery Center (ORC) provides world-renowned autism services at centers in Troy and Brighton. Due to the growing need for autism services in the Brighton, Michigan community, Oxford Recovery Center is breaking ground on a 35,000 square foot expansion of their main campus located at the corner of Whitmore Lake Road and Malby Road.
A groundbreaking ceremony to kick off the project will be held at the new building site directly south of the existing facility on May 17th at 10:00. The public is invited to attend. Brivar Construction will be handling the construction of this major investment in the Brighton community.
ORC moved into the current 32,000 square foot building in 2018. “When we moved to the Brighton campus, we felt we would never fill up the building,” says Dr. Tami Peterson, Founder and CEO at Oxford Recovery Center. In just two years, the demand for services has increased dramatically.
Casey Diskin, Executive Director of Autism Services, credits the synergistic approach to treating autism as the main factor in the center’s amazing growth. “Autism diagnoses are on the rise, but more and more parents of children see the benefits of our approach to treatment,” says Diskin. “We believe autism is a medical condition and treat it as such.” Oxford offers more than traditional Applied Behavior Analysis services. “We offer treatments and therapies designed to help our autism patients reach their potential,” explains Diskin. “We have seen amazing results combining hyperbaric oxygen therapy, neurofeedback, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy.” The center does not stop there. A comprehensive testing and medical consultation program helps to isolate medical problems and provides a means to solve them.
This is nothing new for Oxford Recovery Center. It has been providing these services to patients to treat more than 100 medical conditions since 2008. “Our goal is to help our patients get their lives back after an illness or injury. “No matter what your condition, we probably treat it,” says Peterson. “We have successfully treated everything from autism and stroke to macular degeneration and Lyme disease.”
As part of the expansion is a remodeling of the current facility. “All of our services other than autism will be housed in the current facility,” says Gary Marken, Chief Operations Officer at Oxford Recovery Center. “We have already converted 6,500 Square feet of unused space into areas for Speech and Occupational Therapies and a large multi-purpose room for the autism program.” Part of the plan is to expand the company’s hyperbaric oxygen therapy program. “Currently, we operate five hyperbaric oxygen chambers,” continues Marken. “We will be expanding our footprint to include three Chambers.”
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is the cornerstone of Oxford Recovery Centers success. Using a medical-grade, hard chamber, Oxford is able to deliver 100% oxygen under pressure. Our bodies use oxygen to heal and regenerate themselves, and nothing provides the body with more healing oxygen than HBOT. The treatment is powerful because it floods the body with so much oxygen causing it to concentrate in plasma. This allows the oxygen to reach areas red blood cells cannot and it penetrates deeper into damaged tissues. “Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has many medical benefits including destroying harmful bacteria, encouraging blood vessel growth, fighting viruses, and healing wounds to name a few,” says Peterson “Perhaps the biggest benefit and why it is so effective in treating so many conditions is its ability to reduce inflammation. The concentrated levels of oxygen stimulate intracellular signaling proteins, which upregulate genetic expression of anti-inflammatory molecules.”

Casey Diskin- ABA Thearpy

Casey Diskin– Executive Director of ARTS – Autism Services at ORC.
ABA can help with the following
1. Build Confidence
2. Make and maintain friendships
3. Help improve sleep
4. Help improve focus and attention
5. Develop executive functioning skills

Casey Diskin – started her work with people with Autism in 2004 while attending school at Wayne State University. After receiving her masters degree from Macquarie University in Sydney Australia, Diskin moved back to Michigan to work with ORC on their new Autism Program.

Casey Diskin Earns Spot on 36 Under 36 for Contributions to her Community

..Casey Homeschool Alternative FINAL

Jewish News and The Well have partnered on an annual list of professional Jewish people under the age of 36. These people had made  landmark contributions to their communities and to the world.

Casey Diskin was recently named on the list of 36 under 36.

Casey Diskin has made a tremendous impact in her community by helping children with disabilities.   For her contributions, she has earned many distinguished titles and gained much recognition. Recently, she was named on a list of Jewish professionals under the age of 36 who are recognized for their impactful work in their communities. 

The Detroit Jewish News partners with The Well every year to highlight 36 young professionals

 In 2019, they named Casey Diskin as one of the top young Jewish professionals. Those who appear on the 36 under 36 are described by its publisher as go-getters, doers, entrepreneurs, philanthropists, activists, and community organizers who are featured in the year’s publication. 

The Well, which is half of the governing body overseeing the professional list, is an inclusive Jewish community-building and spirituality-outreach initiative geared to the needs of millennials and the unaffiliated or under-affiliated in the Metro Detroit area. Representatives at The Well believe that Jewish ethics, values and spirituality can and should be directly applicable to our lives as part of a radically inclusive Jewish community. It is their hope that these elements should drive us to have a position impact. 

Background about The Well

The Well was founded in 2015 and the 36 Under 36 was created only a couple of years later. Both are projects of the Lori Talsky Zekelman Fund at Temple Israel. It is the hope of their leaders that by highlighting young professionals.  Casey Diskin inspires  more people to get involved in community-centric Jewish living in Metro Detroit. They accomplish these goals through relationship building, network weaving and participant-driven programming among other outreaches.

Casey Diskin

Casey Diskin has helped uncover new solutions for children with autism and other developmental disorders. She completed her undergraduate program at Wayne StateUniversity and earned her master’s from Macquarie University. Today, she provides support to families with children who have challenging behaviors. She advocates for children in schools, helps families secure insurance coverage for therapeutic services. 

Casey Diskin serves as Director at Recovery Center for Autism

Casey Diskin serves as a director at a Michigan-based recovery center where big things are happening to improve the lives of children with disabilities.  Diskin has developed a unique approach to care that is gaining increased attention in the medical field as she helps not only the children, but their whole families. Diskin currently oversees an autism recovery program where she uses HBOT (hyperbaric oxygen therapy) combined with speech and occupational therapy, and applied behavior analysis to treat her patients. Her results have been very impressive and considered a huge success.

“Once patients with neurological conditions began seeing the great results Casey Diskin could accomplish through hyperbaric oxygen therapy, parents with children on the autism spectrum began asking her to perform the same therapy for their kids.”

Diskin claims that she hears stories constantly of happier parents and children as a result of treatment. To name a few of the successes, parents are reporting that their children have built new friendships and are also preforming better in school. “Medically, there is evidence that individuals with autism have inflammation in the brain,” says Casey Diskin. “HBOT medically addresses the issue by reducing the inflammation. Our novel program is a multi-therapy approach to treating autism. We believe in creating a synergistic approach that allows us to treat the medical issues of our clients while simultaneously teaching functional socially significant life skills.”

 

Casey Diskin Develops Support Groups for Families of Children with Autism

Casey Diskin

A pioneer in novel therapies for children with disabilities, Casey Diskin has developed a reputation for intense dedication to her clients and creates opportunities for their families to connect with people in similar circumstances and find relief. To help parents and families of children with autism, she created support groups in Michigan that meet each month and provide support to one another. 

 

For over a decade now, Casey Diskin has studied autism and searched for new ways to approach therapy and care of children with disabilities. She’s also studied the effect that autism has on not just the child, but their parents and families as well. Today, in addition to actively

working with children with disabilities, Diskin runs two support groups for parents of children with autism in Brighton and Troy, Michigan. 

 

Diskin earned an undergraduate degree from Wayne State University where she focused on solutions for children suffering from life-altering disabilities. She later studied at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia and enrolled in a program that taught to develop functional life skills through naturalistic teaching. Casey Diskin has been a vital asset to facilities focusing on alleviating and resolving autism through modern therapies and procedures ever since. She’s one of the first in her field to apply hyperbaric oxygen therapy to treat autism, and has uncovered significant results with her clients. 

 

“Through hyperbaric therapy and behavior therapy, we’re helping children suffering from autism and other disabilities succeed and achieve real personal growth,” says Casey Diskin. “However, it’s important that we also give the parents of these children a place to meet and uplift one another. To help, I run a pair of support groups that meet each month in Michigan, either in Troy or in Brighton.”

 

While all parents of children facing a disability ultimately experience more stress than most, parents of children with autism have been statistically shown to experience even more stress than those with other disabilities. These parents will likely have to keep up with their kids constantly to avoid meltdowns and prevent them from overloading their senses and acting out. They also must make regular visits to medical facilities with their children, which can prove to be a major struggle. 

 

Casey Diskin coaches her clients’ parents during her group meetings to be more mindful and reinforces positive adult development to help them achieve peace at home. During the group therapy sessions, parents and family members learn techniques to relax like meditation and various breathing exercises. They also participate in enlightening discussions with other families, gaining perspective and insight beyond their individual situations. Diskin helps them reduce their worry and learn to better accept present conditions as well as look towards future growth with more faith. 

 

“Parents of children with autism face a unique challenge that is often underrepresented and

underappreciated by many in the medical field,” says Casey Diskin. “Support groups like ours

boost their morale and show them first-hand that they’re not in this fight alone.”

Casey Diskin Explains the Usefulness of Hyperbarics in Treating Autism

Casey Diskin

Casey Diskin has served a number of professional roles since earning her degree, focusing on researching and uncovering life-long solutions for children with disabilities. She has developed novel approaches to care in her career that combine elements like behavior therapy with hyperbaric therapy to achieve optimal results. 

 

During her education at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, Casey Diskin pursued a unique program focusing on functional life skills through naturalistic teaching. This unique approach fueled Diskin’s drive to provide real solutions to children with disabilities, particularly those with autism. 

 

Casey Diskin believes that autism is recoverable, as it’s diagnosed on a set of deficits such as social and emotional functionality. She feels that all practitioners should seek to increase those deficits until they no longer meet the criteria for an autism diagnosis, and accomplishes this in her own career by relying on a multi-faceted approach to treatment. 

 

Apart from behavior therapy, Casey Diskin supports hyperbaric oxygen therapy to achieve results, which is a growing practice in treating children with autism. In this type of therapy, 100% oxygen––after the air pressure is increased —is pumped into a pressurized chamber . During therapy, patients’ lungs gather more oxygen then they normally would, which will kill pathogens or bacteria present in the body. 

 

The body’s tissues require a satisfactory supply of oxygen to function optimally. During any injury, tissue is damaged and requires a higher amount of oxygen to heal correctly. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy essentially amps up the amount of oxygen blood can carry, which restores normal levels of blood gases and improves tissue healing and function. 

 

It is a well established principle that hyperbaric oxygen therapy can alleviate issues at the core of the autism diagnosis, essentially reducing swelling in the brain and healing it to allow children to live more productive lives. 

 

One parent claims to have seen dramatic results after a single treatment. She reports that her daughter was able to kneel, hold a ball, and begin to speak following one hyperbaric oxygen treatment, all of which she was unable to do only the day before. Seeing such an impact with her child, the parent continued opting in for hyperbaric treatment and after a week claimed her daughter no longer needed occupational or speech therapy.

 

“When we don’t feel well, it is harder to learn. Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy heals the body so that the client can develop new skills more quickly  and easily” says Casey Diskin.

 

Casey Diskin Encourages Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Autism Recovery

Casey Diskin

After earning two advanced degrees in the field of child development, Casey Diskin focused her career on helping kids with disabilities overcome daily obstacles and achieve lasting personal growth through a range of specialized approaches. She believes one of the biggest solutions for children with autism is hyperbaric oxygen therapy, which relies on controlled pressure to increase oxygen in the blood. 

 

Casey Diskin has served roles in a variety of medical facilities that center around child behavior and kids with learning or other disabilities. Her work helps children improve their behavior and achieve growth through specialized teachings and therapies relying on breakthrough advances. Diskin believes one of the most underutilized resources available to accomplish this is hyperbaric oxygen therapy, which has been used for years to treat many medical concerns but has only recently been used for children with disabilities. 

 

“Medically, there is evidence that individuals with autism bace inflammation in the brain,” says Casey Diskin. “Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) medically addresses the issue by reducing the inflammation. The program we’ve created is a multi-therapy approach to treating autism that includes sessions of HBOT for each client.  We believe in creating a synergistic approach that allows us to treat the medical issues of our clients while simultaneously teaching functional socially significant life skills.”

 

Casey Diskin says that after seeing the results from hyperbaric oxygen therapy, parents across the country began seeking out HBOT therapy for children on the autism spectrum.

 

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy works by infusing pure oxygen in a pressurized room or tube that patients breathe in over their session. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is already a well-established treatment in medical facilities throughout the country for decompression sickness, which is a hazard of scuba diving. However, it has been used to treat a variety of conditions such as serious infections, air bubbles in blood vessels, and wounds that won’t heal because of components like radiation injury or diabetes.

 

When patients undergo hyperbaric oxygen therapy, they are placed in a chamber where the air pressure is increased. Under these conditions, human lungs can take in more oxygen than would be possible when breathing oxygen normally. The vascular system then carries the high levels of oxygen throughout the body and uses it as needed. The heightened oxygen levels can fight off bacteria and stimulate the release of growth factors and stem cells, which promote faster and more thorough healing.

 

The human body’s tissues need an adequate supply of oxygen to function, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy increases the overall amount of oxygen your blood can carry. Already, parents have found that employing this therapy on kids with autism promotes improved brain function that only gets better with continued use. 

 

“While our clients heal internally from HBOT, they work one-on-one with our team each day to develop the functional skills such as potty training, putting on their shoes, making friends or persevering through tough tasks,” says Casey Diskin. “Our program works on the skills needed for success at school and in the home, ultimately helping us prepare these kids for a better life and a brighter future.”

Casey Diskin Was Named one of “Jewish News” and “The Well’s” 36 Under 36

Casey Diskin

Casey Diskin has spent her entire career working with kids with disabilities and has made a significant impact on the lives of children and families across the country. To honor her contributions, she was named one of “Jewish News” and “the Well’s” 36 Under 36, a title given to exceptional Jewish contributors under the age of 36. 

 

Each year, The Detroit Jewish News partners with The Well to highlight 36 young professionals who have had a tremendous impact on both Jewish and general communities. Last year, they named Casey Diskin to the list for her work in the community and especially her work with kids with disabilities. The people who appear on the list are described as go-getters, doers, entrepreneurs, philanthropists, activists, and community organizers who are nominated through the program each year. 

 

The 36 Under 36 is a project organized by The Well, which is an inclusive Jewish community building, education and spirituality outreach initiative geared to the needs of millennials and the unaffiliated or under-affiliated in the Metro Detroit area. The belief of The Well is that Jewish ethics, values and spirituality can and should be directly applicable to our lives as part of a radically inclusive Jewish community. In addition, they believe these elements should drive us to positively impact both intimate communities and the world at large.

 

They achieve this vision by supporting young professionals like Casey Diskin and increasing the number of people actively participating in community-centric Jewish living in Metro Detroit. The Well accomplishes this by means of relationship building, network weaving and participant-driven programming. As a whole, The Well is a project of the Lori Talsky Zekelman Fund at Temple Israel.

 

Through their 36 under 36 listing, the group is able to highlight the achievements of young Jewish professionals and spread the positive work they do in communities across Chicago and the surrounding area. At the same time, the list inspires others to get involved in their communities, both general and Jewish. The Well was founded in 2015 and the 36 Under 36 was created just a couple of years later. 

 

Casey Diskin has worked with children with autism and other developmental disorders since earning her degree in 2004. She completed her undergraduate program at Wayne State University and earned a master’s degree from Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia before completing an internship through Melbourne University that provided real-world experience to support her education. 

 

Today, Casey Diskin collaborates with  Behavior analysts (BCBAs), Speech therapists and occupational therapists to provide support to families with children that present challenging behaviors. 

From Abroad to Metro Detroit, Casey Diskin Brings a Unique Perspective to Behavior Therapy

Casey Diskin

Since completing her education, Casey Diskin has gone on to help children with disabilities to learn and grow through specialized teachings and outstanding leadership. Along the way, she worked at a number of facilities geared towards helping children improve behavior, including serving as a behavior therapist for the Friendship Circle in West Bloomfield.

For years, Casey Diskin has implemented specialized teachings to assist children with disabilities, especially working with those with autism to promote personal growth. Her distinguished work has led her to take on a number of roles in child development, including the Learning Center in Sydney Australia and Friendship Circle in Metro Detroit.

Casey Diskin began developing tactics and programs to improve the lives of children with disabilities during school, focusing especially on children with autism after graduating from Wayne State University in 2004. She also attended Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, where she pursued a master’s program that helped build up a career helping children from all over the world. Her work seeks to teach lasting lessons and techniques that not only help educate children with autism, but also improves their overall life experiences.

She has been praised for her landmark contributions and unique approach to care and learning for special needs kids, which has laid the foundation for a promising and quickly-growing career. She attributes the details of her unique approach to her program at Macquarie University, which taught her to implement a focus on functional life skills through naturalistic teaching. She returned to America in 2013 and helped launch numerous education programs that are centered around autism recovery.

During her career, Casey Diskin worked as a behavior therapist for the Friendship Circle in West Bloomfield Michigan, which is a non-profit organization affiliated with Lubavitch of Michigan. The goal of the Friendship Circle is “to provide every individual with special needs the support friendship and inclusion that they deserve.” They accomplish this by providing support and assistance to thousands of special needs children and their families. In their work, the Friendship Circle implement recreational, social, educational and vocational programming to provide a well-rounded approach to care and development.

Friendship Circle also provides support to individuals and families struggling with isolation, addiction and other family-related crises. Additionally, the Friendship Circle enriches its vast network of volunteers by allowing them to reap the rewards of selfless giving. The non-profit was founded 25 years ago and has assembled thousands of dedicated supporters across its history, with more people getting involved each year.

As a behavior therapist for the Friendship Circle, Casey Diskin used therapies to observe learned behaviors and how each child’s environment influences these behaviors. From this, she was able to create an individualized plan for mental improvement for each child. Today, her vast experience and knowledge of behavior therapy help her determine practical solutions for countless children with special needs and their families that result in true growth for everyone.